Disabled People In Poverty Made To Pay For Social Care

23 councils in Scotland are asking disabled people with incomes below the poverty line to pay care charges. Scotland has a serious problem with poverty and people with learning disabilities are often worst hit.  Yet councils penalise people with learning disabilities who are living below the poverty line by making them pay for their charges.  Continue reading

Stop Social Care Charges – Please sign petition

social care chargesSocial care in any form is an equality and human rights issue.  It is an essential part of the infrastructure of a fair and just society which respects, upholds and guarantees the equality and human rights of its citizens.  A society which pursues a policy of charging those who are entitled to use non-residential care services does not do this.  Instead care charging uncompromisingly demands that they pay more than any able bodied person to achieve the same basic human rights.   In some instances it can lead to a disabled individual deciding to forego much needed care and support, a decision which will entail significant risk of harm or further deterioration of an illness or condition.

Click here to read more and sign the petition.

20,000 lose out because of tightening eligibility criteria

In a new report, LDAS have uncovered the hidden effects of social care cuts in Scotland.  Over 20,000 older people, people with learning disabilities and others  are no longer getting vital social support since the start of the 2007 economic recession.   By examining Government statistics and comparing them to the growth in the elderly population we have found that many people who might previously been eligible for social care services are no longer getting help.   Continue reading

Fight to save the Engine Shed set for victory

Rumours are beginning to emerge from deep within Edinburgh Council that a change of approach to supported employment in Edinburgh will be announced in September.   After much discussion and a lot of campaigning, councillors from Edinburgh seem to be proposing a Status Quo approach for the next year.  During that time, careful thought will be given to how new developments can be married with the existing structure of services to ensure that people continue to get support.  Serious attention is likely to be given to whether competitive tendering is an appropriate way to manage supported employment services and a more constructive approach will be looked at.  Continue reading

The case of Stuart Devlin: the real impact of social care cuts

Local Authorities across Scotland are seeking ‘personalisation’ of social care services. However in many cases this is being used as cover for the implementation of cuts. Learning Disability Alliance Scotland looks at one such case;

Stuart Devlin is a 30 year old man who was born with Cerebral Palsy and learning difficulties. Despite the disadvantages he faces every day of his life, he is determined to make the most of his life. Continue reading